Business Success Relies on Ubiquity

Ashik Ahmed

Ashik Ahmed

CEO, CTO & Co-Founder

November 21, 2012

Business Success Relies on Ubiquity

Ashik Ahmed, CEO, CTO & Co-Founder
November 21, 2012


Business Success Relies on Ubiquity
Once upon a time, success in business was not necessarily determined – at least not solely – by the quality of your product. In fact, in the past, success was as tightly correlated to your ability (as an individual or a business) to be all things to all people. The concept of promising the world to everyone! In hindsight there are a few limitations to this business model, but, for quite a while, many businesses subscribed to this way of thinking.

Today however, this paradigm has shifted somewhat. Driven by changes in technology, access to more accurate information and the ability to get what you need from around the globe within days, today’s success-driven business model is not about pure product dominance, but more about being all-accessible, to all people, at all times. Welcome to the age of product and service ubiquity.

Access All Areas
In making the proclamation that ubiquity is the key to successful business, we should perhaps, explain our thinking a little bit. Firstly, we recognize that the concept of ubiquity – being all-accessible, to everyone, at any time – is not necessarily going to offer the same value to some businesses/industries as it will to others. After all, we recognize that manufacturing processes are not necessarily going to derive the same benefit from this model as say a retail outlet. Furthermore, the actual manufacturing processes don’t need to be everywhere, nor in the public spectrum.

However, this said, value can be added to core elements of a business irrespective of industry or size. For example, the way that manufacturers communicate with clients, or provide access to real-time information about the status of a production run, may be the difference between them landing a large contract, or missing out. DHL and courier services have been doing this for years. Just type in your parcel code on their website and voila, you can track where your parcel is. The peace of mind this offers clients goes a long way to improving how you think of their service.

Or think of the retail outlet that has an online store that is optimized not just for laptops, but for tablets and smartphones, allowing you to purchase items at anytime of the day, even when you are on the go. They get another sale from a simple tweak to their offering and you get the time to do what you want whilst still getting the shopping.

The argument exists that businesses have greater need than ever to ingratiate themselves with their audience so that the decision to use a product or service is natural and almost devoid of conscious thought.

The future of work is built on ubiquity
The way we access each other and access information and thus how we live our lives is evolving faster today than at any other point in time. Today, we demand that we have answers more quickly, and that we can share information more easily. The result is that we are evolving and now have lower attention spans than any time in history. In fact, a recent study found that our attention spans have dropped to 8 seconds from 12 since the start of the century.

Knowing this, the argument exists that businesses have greater need than ever to ingratiate themselves with their audience so that the decision to use a product or service is natural and almost devoid of conscious thought.

How you do this will depend on your industry, on your client base and on the outcomes you are looking to achieve. However, by ingratiating yourself with your target market, not only are you increasing your brand relevance with your audience, but you are adding value to the customer equation. When you combine this with your product or service (which are of course already brilliant) then you have the ingredients for a brilliant business. On the other hand, in failing to make yourself ubiquitous and provide your clients with a value add proposition, you are likely to be missing a huge opportunity.

Important Notice
The information contained in this article is general in nature and you should consider whether the information is appropriate to your needs. Legal and other matters referred to in this article are of a general nature only and are based on Deputy's interpretation of laws existing at the time and should not be relied on in place of professional advice. Deputy is not responsible for the content of any site owned by a third party that may be linked to this article and no warranty is made by us concerning the suitability, accuracy or timeliness of the content of any site that may be linked to this article. Deputy disclaims all liability (except for any liability which by law cannot be excluded) for any error, inaccuracy, or omission from the information contained in this article and any loss or damage suffered by any person directly or indirectly through relying on this information.


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ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Ashik Ahmed
Ashik is the Co-Founder and CEO/CTO at Deputy. He spends most of his time thinking crazy things about Deputy and how it will change the world.
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