Deputy’s 2019 Late to Work Report

Mathew Beeche

Mathew Beeche

PR and Communications Director

June 11, 2019

Deputy’s 2019 Late to Work Report

Mathew Beeche, PR and Communications Director
June 11, 2019


Deputy is back this year for our annual report on the punctuality of the shift worker for 2019. And this year, we’re analyzing the habits of these four generations currently making up the global hourly workforce:

  • Generation Z (Born 1996-2012)
  • Generation Y (Born 1981-1995)
  • Generation X (Born 1965-1980)
  • Baby Boomers (Born 1946-1964)

Good news is the majority of shift workers are still clocking in on time. More specifically, 95% of shifts in Australia, 90 % of shifts in the United Kingdom, and more than 80% of shifts in the United States were clocked in on time within the last 12 months.

To dive deeper and to learn more regarding the punctuality of shift workers from different generations, countries, as well as a host of other helpful information, keep reading as we give an overview of some of the information you can expect to find within the report.

And to see it all for yourself, click here to be taken to the report so you can download it for yourself.


Analysis of workers in Australia, the United Kingdom, & the United States

Between March 2018 and March 2019, the day most people were late for work was March 2nd for the United States and December 14th for Australia and the United Kingdom. On the other end, the day most people were early for work was December 21st for Australia, March 4th for the United Kingdom, and March 1st for the United States.

Another fun fact is everyone around the world all run late on the same day, Friday!

A. Late vs. Early: United States

  • American women were late for 6.7% of their scheduled shifts, on time for 83.7% of their shifts, and early for 9.6% of their shifts.
  • American men were late for 5.3% of their scheduled shifts, on time for 86.8% of their shifts, and early for 7.9% of their shifts.

B. Late vs. Early: Australia

  • Australian women were late for 1.1% of their scheduled shifts, on time for 97.5% of their shifts, and early for 1.4% of their shifts.
  • Australian men were late for 1.2% of their scheduled shifts, on time for 97.2% of their shifts, and early for 1.6% of their shifts.

C. Late vs. Early: United Kingdom

  • British women were late for 2.5% of their scheduled shifts, on time for 93.9% of their shifts, and early for 3.6% of their shifts.
  • British men were late for 2.3% of their scheduled shifts, on time for 94.7% of their shifts, and early for 3% of their shifts.

Generation Late vs. Generation Early

In regards to the generational gap, our report uncovered a number of interesting findings relevant to business owners. Here’s a handful of insights our report found:

  • In Australia, men within Generation Z are most likely to be late for a shift while female baby boomers are the least likely to be late for their shifts.
  • Within the UK, both men and women are equally as likely to be late for work while female Baby Boomers are the least likely to show up late for a shift.
  • In the United States, women in Generation Z are most likely to be late for work than any other generation. Male Baby Boomers are the least likely to show up late for work.

As we can see from the punctuality seen among Baby Boomers, they just don’t make employees like they used to.


Which locations are most/ least likely to show up on time?

 

Australia, the United Kingdom, and the United States are big countries with different work cultures depending on the region. Take a look at the data below detailing the areas known for having punctual employees.

Australia

  • Employees in Queensland are least likely to show up late and the most likely to show up on time, while employees in the Australian Capital Territory are most likely to show up early.

The United Kingdom

  • Employees in Scotland are least likely to show up late as well as most likely to show up on time, while employees in Northern Ireland are most likely to show up early.

The United States

  • Employees in Washington are least likely to show up late, employees in Georgia are most likely to show up on time, and California employees are most likely to show up early.

Fun Fact: Washington and California both have their own set of Predictive Scheduling laws, which lends the idea that these regulations also work to ensure employees don’t show up late for work.


The Negative effects of the ‘Always On’ culture

While the date above touches on a number of different topics revolving around the punctuality of employees from all over the world, it’s important to note the cultural shifts that led to employees coming in late, getting burnt out, and negatively affecting their work-life balance in general.

The cultural shift we examine within the report is the rise of communication platforms that make it more difficult for workers to disconnect when they’re off the clock. This includes Slack, Snapchat, Instagram, LinkedIn, Facebook messenger, as well as a number of other avenues employers have to reach employees.

While these platforms have strengthened the interconnected nature of the modern day workplace, the negative side aspect is many employees feel like they must be on-call all the time. In fact, 57% of employees referenced the loss of the sacred dinner hour because of managers that expect responses at all hours of the day. And a workplace that forgets about their staff’s work-life balance is putting their team at risk of chronic stress, burnout, depression, and insomnia.


Download Deputy’s 2019 Late to Work Report now!

The information above is just a taste of what you can come to expect within our annual report. No matter which industry you’re in, our report offers relevant information on all shift workers so you can better understand the cultural and generational attitudes affecting the punctuality of the modern day workforce. To check it out for yourself, click here now.

And no matter which generation your employees fall into or the country they’re in, you’ll need a workforce management platform able to streamline your employee scheduling so you can focus on strategies to better your business.

After you’re done checking out our report, click below to begin your own trial to see why Deputy is trusted by brands like Amazon and Nike.

TRY NIKE & AMAZON'S TRUSTED WORKFORCE MANAGEMENT APP
 

Important Notice
The information contained in this article is general in nature and you should consider whether the information is appropriate to your needs. Legal and other matters referred to in this article are of a general nature only and are based on Deputy's interpretation of laws existing at the time and should not be relied on in place of professional advice. Deputy is not responsible for the content of any site owned by a third party that may be linked to this article and no warranty is made by us concerning the suitability, accuracy or timeliness of the content of any site that may be linked to this article. Deputy disclaims all liability (except for any liability which by law cannot be excluded) for any error, inaccuracy, or omission from the information contained in this article and any loss or damage suffered by any person directly or indirectly through relying on this information.


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ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Mathew Beeche
is the PR and Communications Director at Deputy. He is a former media commentator from the Australian tech startup ecosystem who once auditioned for the role of the Red Power Ranger.
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